Date of Award

9-1-2020

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

DiLalla, Lisabeth

Second Advisor

Knutson, Douglas

Abstract

The current study examined the way that personal identities influenced psychology trainees’ experiences during clinical supervision and how these trainees engaged in multicultural conversations during this process. Researchers have identified the ways that systemic andinterpersonal marginalization are pervasive across contexts and affect one’s well-being. This is present both in general graduate school experiences as well as the clinical supervision process. Few researchers have explored the experiences of multiracial women in graduate school and supervision. Further, there is a dearth of literature exploring how supervisees promote justice through resistance during the supervision process. This study filled that gap by exploring the way that multiracial trainees engaged in intersectional resistance during the supervision process. A consensual qualitative paradigm was used to highlight participant voices and providean exploratory examination of these experiences. Core domains identified included: community, participant identity, graduate programexperiences, positive experiences in clinical supervision, challenges in clinical supervision, experiences of multiracial identity, multicultural considerations, resistance, and recommendations. Participants defined resistance as speaking out about injustice, advocating for clients, and helping others to see new perspectives. Identity and resistance were best conceptualized from an ecological framework that examined the impact of graduate school context (e.g., peers, supervision). The supervisory relationship was a particularly important factor that impacted participants’ ability to engage in resistance. Implications for supervisorsand trainees are explored.

Available for download on Thursday, September 29, 2022

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