Date of Award

5-1-2015

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Agricultural Sciences

First Advisor

Pense, Seburn

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to examine agricultural educators and adult agricultural education programming offered through secondary agricultural education programs within Illinois and Missouri using a non-experimental research design and a self-report questionnaire known as the Adult Agricultural Education Inventory (AAEI). AAEI was used to ascertain the level of expectancy and value held for adult agricultural education by secondary agricultural educators. The Expectancy-Value Theory (Eccles & Wigfield, 2002; Wigfield & Eccles, 2000) posits that if an individual holds high degrees of expectancy and value for a task, action or activity, that individual will continue to persist in that task, action or activity. There were 5 components of the AAEI, regarding adult agricultural education, including: 1) Utility Value and Attainment Value, 2) Expectancy and Intrinsic Value, 3) Time and Availability, 4) Community Demand and 5) Educator Knowledge. These 5 components were analyzed against a demographic profile of agricultural educators, constructed in this research, to delineate those groups of agricultural educators that indicate the higher levels of value and expectancy for adult programming. Value for adult programming was greater for those with Master's Degrees and those that taught in career and technical education centers. Expectancy for adult programming was greater for those educators who were from Illinois, educators holding a 10 month contract and males. Educators from Missouri indicated the highest amount of time and availability for adult programming.

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