Date of Award

1-1-2009

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Workforce Education and Development

First Advisor

Baker, Clora Mae

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to explore whether there were differences in the transfer experiences among students who participated in the Individualized Two Plus Two transfer program compared to those who did not participate. I felt as though this information was noteworthy as research shows that the experiences among college transfer students are filled with problems. Most often these obstacles surround the transfer of course credits to the new school (Weschler, 1989). Examining the Individualized Two Plus Two program was conducted to ascertain whether the implementation of the program increased the level of satisfaction among the students in this study. The study used mixed methods by combining a narrative analysis of in-depth interviews and an analysis of survey responses. The interviews resulted in two major themes. The complexities of transferring and settling in: Life on campus. Similar concerns were found between both interview groups; however those not in the transfer program overwhelmingly noted that some sort of pamphlet or retreat would be helpful for them with the transfer process. These students did not know about the Two Plus Two program and indicated that had they known, they definitely would have participated. This was the only major difference between the two interview groups in this study. Both the interviews and survey data led the researcher to the conclusion that there were no big major differences in the experiences of students within the transfer program compared to those who were not. Recommendations included replication of the study with a different group of students to continue the examination of whether these types of transitional programs should be made available by the four year institutions to incoming transfer students.

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