Date of Award

5-2020

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Behavior Analysis and Therapy

First Advisor

Mucky, Linda

Second Advisor

Dixon, Mark

Third Advisor

Koch, Shane

Abstract

The present study sought to identify the effects that derived relational training had on simulated gambling behavior with slot machines. Prior to conducting any relational training procedures, participants' relational responses in each contextual condition was probed. Each of the four backgrounds/conditions (red, blue, green, yellow) were presented with various stimuli from differing stimulus classes. Twenty trials were presented with no feedback for correct responding. Upon completion of the probes, pretest preference assessments were administered with blue and red slot machines being concurrently available for twenty trials then green and yellow slot machines doing the same. Following the pretest preference assessment, relational training began, here stimuli from each of the stimulus classes were presented on screen for three of the contextual conditions with the blue contextual condition left out to assess for possible derived relational responses. After completion, the second set of relational probes and posttest preference assessments began to assess if relational training altered the response allocation of slot machines and accuracy of responding during probes. After relational training, all participants showed an increase in response allocation to the red slot machine and a decrease to the blue. The yellow slot machine was selected increasingly with three participants while green was selected more often with one individual, one staying at the same number, and two selecting it less than in the pretest.

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