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Document Type

Article

Abstract

In two experiments, 40 undergraduate students were trained on conditional discrimination tasks (matching to sample) involving 1 of 4 types of instructional histories: (a) true instructions followed by false instructions; (b) false instructions followed by true instructions; (c) true instructions followed by true instructions, with a change of reinforced sample-comparison relation; and (d) false instructions followed by false instructions, with a change of reinforced sample-comparison relation. The effects of a history of true versus false instructions on later instruction-following could be understood as the outcome of interactions between instructional accuracy and current contingencies.

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