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Document Type

Article

Abstract

Two experiments examined the partial reversal versus whole
reversal advantage effect of which the reversal was mastered
faster when only one of two discriminations was reversed than
when both discriminations were reversed after criterion training in
two concurrent discriminations. In Experiment 1, rats were trained
to criterion on two choice concurrent discriminations.
Subsequently, Group Partial, in which only one of the two tasks
was reversed, but the other was not reversed, learned their
reversal faster than Group Control, in which one of the two tasks
was reversed but the other was removed and a new discrimination
task was added, which in turn learned their reversal faster than
Group Whole, in which two tasks were reversed. Experiment 2
replicated the results observed in Experiment 1 in two go/no-go
concurrent discriminations. These results indicate that both a
facilitation in the partial condition and a retardation in the whole
condition make significant contribution to the partial reversal
versus whole reversal advantage effect, and that stimulusstimulus
associations between the discriminative stimuli that
signal either reward, or nonreward, in the two tasks are not formed
after criterion training.

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