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Document Type

Article

Abstract

The present study examined choice in humans between a
single-response task and a task with multiple alternatives (i.e., a
multichoice task). The alternatives provided points based on a
predetermined probability. The present study had two conditions.
In the first condition, the degree of preference for the multichoice
task depended on the number of alternatives in it even though
there was no difference in the pOints earned per choice in the two
tasks. In the second condition, some subjects were presented with
the information that all choices among the alternatives resulted in
the same outcome. It was assumed that this information reduced
the efficacy of choice among the alternatives. The efficacy of
choice meant the acquisition of the outcomes might depend on
their choice among the alternatives. These subjects still preferred
the multichoice task, but the degree of preference decreased. The
preference did not change for subjects who did not receive this
information. The present study revealed that preference for the
multichoice task depended on the number of alternatives and the
efficacy of choice among them.

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