Date of Award

12-1-2010

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Rehabilitation Administration and Services

First Advisor

Crimando, William

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in self-perceived abilities of supported employment specialists to perform supported employment processes in relation to their educational backgrounds in South Korea. In order to identify this subject, a research performed survey to 100 supported employment specialist. All supported employment specialists identified were surveyed regarding their self-perceived abilities to perform supported employment processes, along with their demographic characteristics. Two independent variables, education level and academic major, were used in this study. The dependent variable was self-perceived abilities of supported employment specialists to perform seven supported employment processes, such as Job development, Job analysis, Vocational evaluation, Client to job matching, On the job training, Ongoing assessment, and Follow up. The results of this study indicated supported employment specialists who had completed undergraduate degrees perceived their abilities to be significantly higher than supported employment specialists who had completed graduate degree in performing the competencies of each supported employment process, except vocational assessment. However, the significant results in this research hypothesis indicated the opposite outcome to the proposed research hypothesis 2. Next, there is no differences of self-perceived ability relation to performing supported employment between supported employment specialists who had majored (vocational) rehabilitation and supported employment specialists who had majored social work, psychology, and others. Finally, there are no differences of self-perceived ability relation to performing supported employment processes, except job analysis and on-going assessment according to the interaction effect between the education level and major. The findings of this study are discussed in implication for rehabilitation practice and education, and future research.

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