Date of Award

5-1-2017

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Etcheverry, Paul

Abstract

The present studies examined if collective narcissists experience collective shame following an in-group transgression and thereby direct hostility toward their in-group and support reparatory actions. It was hypothesized that the nature of the relationship between an in-group transgression and in-group directed hostility which is mediated by collective shame would change due to the moderating effect of collective narcissism on collective shame. Collective narcissists were expected to experience less collective shame following an in-group transgression thus reducing the amount of in-group directed hostility they would experience. The results of Study 1 and Study 2 did not provide evidence in favor of the moderation hypothesis. The finding of Study 1 and Study 2 did provide further support for the relationship between the in-group transgression and in-group hostility which is mediated by collective shame. Ordering of specific measures were manipulated to ensure the results were not impacted in some manner by order of completion. This research has provided additional evidence for the presence of in-group hostility through collective shame following an in-group transgression. Future research on collective narcissism should explore in-group characteristics and intergroup contexts that modulate collective narcissism.

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