Date of Award

5-1-2016

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Rehabilitation

First Advisor

Crimando, William

Abstract

This study investigates the relationships between demographic characteristics, perceptions of the academic climate, and the employment continuation plans of tenured and tenure-track faculty of color in CORE accredited rehabilitation counselor education (RCE) programs. Furthermore, this study aims to identify which factors best predict the employment continuation plans for this population. Participants were administered The Faculty Retention Questionnaire (FRQ) to examine these relationships. The sample in this study consisted of 63 tenured and tenure-track faculty of color employed by CORE accredited RCE programs. Due to the small sample size and the violation of the assumption of normality, bootstrapping techniques were used to resample the data. A univariate general linear model (GLM) was conducted to determine if the demographic characteristics (self-reported race, ethnicity, gender, country of origin, and tenure status) could predict the employment continuation plans of tenured and tenure-track faculty of color in CORE accredited RCE programs. Results of the GLM indicted that demographic characteristics were non-significant predictors. Multiple linear regression analysis was utilized to determine if the regression scores for the perception of academic climate components (role as researcher, tenure/promotion opportunities, workplace conditions, social climate, faculty/student relationships, role clarity, inter-role conflict, and person/role conflict) could predict the employment continuation plans of faculty of color in CORE accredited RCE programs. Results of the multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the linear combination of regression scores predicted 28.5% of the variance in the employment continuation plans. Inter-role conflict was the only statistically significant predictor. Consequently, understanding how perceptions of the academic climate by faculty of color affect their employment continuation plans will add to existing body of literature pertaining to retention of faculty of color in counselor education. Additionally, the results of this study may assist in the development and implementation of retention strategies and policies that are supportive of faculty of color.

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