Date of Award

12-2009

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Rehabilitation

First Advisor

Flowers, Carl

Abstract

Substance abuse and dependence has been a problem in the United States for over 100 years (Whitebread, 1995). In the past two decades the abuse and dependence of methamphetamine has increased and the rates have remained steady (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2004). Advances have been made in the development of treatments for substance abuse and dependence. Research has continued to show that treatment modalities enhanced by case management services are more effective in the treatment of substance abuse and dependence. There has also been progress made in the research regarding the therapeutic benefits of employment for persons with substance abuse and dependence. However, the research regarding methamphetamine abuse and dependence is lacking in regards to the effects of employment, and the case management needs of this population. The aim of this study is to expand research on methamphetamine abuse, dependence, and treatment. By using variables including measures of demographics, education, income, utilization of substance abuse treatment services, healthcare coverage, measures of mental health status, measures of physical health status, and measures of arrest record to predict employment status of persons who report methamphetamine use, implications were developed for treatment providers and case managers to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of treatment. The present study utilized the 2006 and 2007 National Survey on Drug Use and Health data to determine if measures of demographics, education, income, utilization of substance abuse treatment services, healthcare coverage, measures of mental health status, measures of physical health status, and measures of arrest record have significant associations to employment status of persons who report methamphetamine use. A chi-square analysis was used to determine which variables have significant associations to employment status. In addition, this study sought to determine if these independent variables are significant predictors of employment status among methamphetamine users. A binary logistic regression analysis was used to predict employment. The results of the study showed that several of the independent variables had significant associations to employment status of persons who report methamphetamine use. However, the binary logistic regression analysis only resulted in one significant predictor. The results of this study were used to develop implications for case managers.

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